• MEDORA

    Our name comes from the place where

    Theodore Roosevelt found his purpose.

    Medora was beloved by Roosevelt from the moment he stepped off a train at 2 AM on September 8, 1883. One day, he would be celebrated on Mount Rushmore. But that day, when his boots touched frontier soil for the first time, he was just 24 years old.

     

     

    Medora would define and refine the values for which Roosevelt would later become revered.

    Medora also stands for resilience, due to the reason Roosevelt returned the next year. His life and early career were marked by promise but also marred by loss. His wife and mother died on the same day: February 14, 1884.

     

    It was Valentine's Day. "The light has gone out of my life" was all he wrote in his journal that evening.

    Roosevelt left New York City for the West once more. His life would become not about what he'd lost, not about what he'd left, but rather about what he'd found, in the West. The values he discovered there changed the world.





    In his own words, "Here, the romance of my life began."


    Roosevelt credited Medora not only with building the character needed for his greatest legacy, his presidency, but also with inspiring his greatest vision, for the National Parks System.

     

    Over a century later, historians would remember it as "the best idea America ever had."

     

     

    "FAR AND AWAY THE BEST PRIZE THAT LIFE HAS TO OFFER IS THE CHANCE TO WORK HARD AT

    WORK WORTH DOING."

     

    THEODORE ROOSEVELT

     

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